Temple U. History 8800 Syllabus

History 8800: Public History and Digital Media
Spring 2011 – Tues 7:30 -10:00pm
(Most) Workshops: Gladfelter 230 Mac Lab,
Discussions: 0348 AB, Anderson Hall

LaDale Winling
lwinling@temple.edu
951 Gladfelter Hall
T/Th 12:30-1:30pm
or by appt.

This course is an introduction to the role of media in presenting history. It will focus both on the ways that emerging media have affected our historical understanding in the past and on developing basic skills in emerging media in our contemporary times. With this dual focus on precedent as well as the present, the course will help develop an understanding of the variety of possible media that have been, are, and may in the future be at the disposal of public historians.

GRADING

Participation 20%
Small Projects 50%
Assessments 10%
Final Project 20%

GRADING SCALE
A 93-100
A- 90-92
B+ 87-89
B 83-86
B- 80-82
C+ 77-79 etc.

CLASS PARTICIPATION – Providing regular, thoughtful discussion on course books and diligent effort in the media workshops. In addition, each student will give a presentation and lead class discussion on one of the course texts. In these weeks, students must use the course site to post and comment before the class session.
20% of Grade

MEDIA CREATION ASSIGNMENTS – Complete an assigned map, audio, video, digitization, and web design project.
10% of Grade Each

MEDIA ASSESSMENT ASSIGNMENTS – Make a 3-page evaluation of an assigned set of media types.
10% of Grade

FINAL PROJECT – Class members will partner with the Temple University Paley Library Special Collections to help conceptualize and create a web portal on the growth of Temple University and its relationship to the North Philadelphia neighborhood. Students will work in groups to develop a web site (both design and write text), to digitize (scan and create metadata) materials from the Special Collections for the library’s digital repository, and create digital content that interprets that relationship.
20% of Grade

Over the course of the semester we will be using online project management and data sharing tools including Google Docs and Dropbox, where you will be able to store and retrieve your work from.

COURSE SCHEDULE

January 18 Introduction

January 25 Orientation to Digitization at Paley Library (Urban Archives)
Photoshop, CONTENTdm, metadata

February 1 Media and the Public Sphere
Jurgen Habermas, Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere
Henry Glassie, Passing the Time in Ballymenone (Blackboard excerpt)

February 10 Media and History I: Photography
Alan Trachtenberg, Reading American Photographs
Joan Schwartz, Picturing Place (Blackboard excerpt)

February 15 Media and History II: Cinema and Television
Marcia Landy, The Historical Film: History and Memory in Media
Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media (Blackboard excerpt)

February 22 New Media
Jay Bolter, Remediation
LaDale Winling, “The Artifact in the Age of Digital Reproduction,” (Blackboard)

March 1 Web Development Workshop – Mac lab, Gladfelter Hall
Dreamweaver, html, css
RESEARCH/DIGITIZATION ASSIGNMENT DUE

March 8 SPRING BREAK (NO CLASS)

March 15 Database Workshop – Mac lab, Gladfelter Hall
MySQL, Web databases, Social Media
MEDIA ASSESSMENT DUE

March 22 Mapping Media Workshop – PC Lab, AC 104, Anderson Hall
ArcGIS, Illustrator, geocoding

March 29 Audio Media Workshop – Mac lab, Gladfelter Hall
Podcasting, Audacity
MAP DUE

April 5 Video Workshop – Mac Lab, Gladfelter Hall
Final Cut, iMovie

April 12 Work Week – NO CLASS
PODCAST DUE

April 19 FINAL WEB PRODUCTS DUE [EDITED: ROUGH DRAFTS OF RESEARCH AND WEB PRODUCTS DUE]

April 26 PRESENTATIONS [EDITED: VIDEO DUE]

May 3 PORTFOLIO AND EVALUATION DUE [EDITED: FINAL DRAFTS OF PAGES AND MEDIA DUE]